Tourist Attractions in Ho Chi Minh City | Caravelle Hotel

Exploring 

Ho Chi Minh City

Opera House

This restored three-story theatre has an auditorium with 1800 seats and with modern light and sound equipment. originally, it was built by the French and intended as an opera house. In 1955 it became South Vietnam’s National Assembly building. Today the building has been renovated as a theater for a variety of traditional and classical performances-plays, concerts, ballet, opera and Vietnamese traditional dance.

 

City Hall

End of Nguyen Hue Street. Originally called the Hôtel de Ville and now formally rebranded the People’s Committee Hall, is a striking cream and yellow French colonial building beautifully floodlit at night.

No entry, but the statue of Uncle Ho in front is a very popular place for photos. 

 

Notre Dame Cathedral

The twin towers of Notre Dame Cathedral have been a familiar landmark in Ho Chi Minh City since the 1880s. In front of the cathedral in a small garden is a delicate statue of the Virgin Mary. The interior of the cathedral is rather plain, unlike most French cathedrals, with no stained glass, but it is a cool escape from the heat outside.

 

Central Post Office

Across from the Notre Dame Cathedral, the vast Post Office was also built in the late 19th century in European style. The interior has hardly been touched since it was built and is dominated by a huge portrait of Ho Chi Minh. The building always seems busy but most people are just visitors rather than customers.

 

Reunification Palace

The Reunification Palace is beautiful in its ugliness, a 1960s monstrosity designed with the help of Soviet architects. Most people will remember the image of a North Vietnamese tank crashing through the gates on 30 April 1975 signifying the fall of Saigon. The tank still graces the front lawn. Rooms open to the public remain exactly as they were in 1975, showing where important meetings were held during the war, as well as some of the private quarters of the president and his family. Most fascinating are a series of underground tunnels housing a telecommunications center.

 

Ho Chi Minh City Museum

Housed in the former building of the Government of Cochinchina, the Ho Chi Minh City Museum (formerly the Revolutionary Museum) contains artifacts, such as weapons, uniforms, medals and old photos, from the period of Communist struggle against the French and the Americans. Unfortunately, the exhibits are only labelled in Vietnamese but some are self-explanatory. Outside the museum is a collection of military hardware including a tank and a helicopter.

 

Historical Museum

Located just inside the entrance to the Botanical Gardens and Zoo, the Historical Museum houses a collection of artifacts covering the last 2,000 years of Vietnamese history including items belonging to ancient cultures such as Dong Son, Oc Eo and Cham. The museum was built in 1929 and the collection assembled by the Ecole Francaise d’Extreme Orient.

 

War Remnants Museum

Formerly known as the Museum of American War Crimes, the name has been toned down so as not to offend its US visitors and is now the War Remnants Museum. This is not a museum for the sensitive as it houses instruments of torture and hundreds of photographs of atrocities committed during the 20th century and, in particular, the Vietnam War. Visitors cannot fail to be moved as the exhibits provide a context for a period of history many only know from old newsreels and Hollywood movies. At the front of the museum is a small collection of military hardware and, most interestingly, the mobile guillotine used by the French colonists to dispense justice throughout the country before World War II.

 

Ben Thanh Market

Ben Thanh Market has long been one of Saigon’s most famous landmarks. The market has been in existence since the French occupation. The original market was located on the shores of Ben Nghe river by old fort Gia Dinh. Its proximity to the fort and the river where merchants and soldiers would land was the reason for its name (Ben meaning pier or port and Thanh meaning fort). In 1859, when the French invaded Saigon and overtook fort Gia Dinh, Ben Thanh Market was destroyed. It was rebuilt shortly thereafter and remained standing until it was moved to its present location in 1899.

 

Rooms & Suites

Read more

See

Book now
Reservations
  • Breakfast included
  • Free wifi
  • Best rate guarantee
  • Earn Peakpoints
English Vietnamese Japanese

19 - 23 Lam Son Square, District 1 Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam,
Tel: (84-8) 3823 4999, Email: hotel@caravellehotel.com
Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Press | Terms of Use

Keep me posted

Follow us

   
   

 

 

2015 Caravelle Saigon. All rights reserved.